Florida remains in direct path of Tropical Storm Dorian

Get latest spaghetti models, track, satellite images of Dorian

By Daniel Dahm – Digital Manager, Troy Bridges – Meteorologist

ORLANDO, Fla. – Tropical Storm Dorian will possibly become a hurricane in the coming days as the storm remains on a direct path to Florida.

As of Tuesday morning, Dorian was 30 miles southeast of St. Lucia and moving west-northwest at 13 mph. Dorian is packing sustained winds of 50 mph.

The latest track takes Dorian as a possible Category 1 hurricane just south of Puerto Rico, if not on top of the island, Wednesday afternoon. Dorian could dump up to 8 inches of rain.

Dorian is expected to weaken as it moves over Hispaniola and heads toward the Bahamas.

Dorian will likely be a tropical storm Friday over the Bahamas and move closer to Florida by Saturday night.

“There is a chance for rapid intensification just before making landfall somewhere along our east coast,” News 6 meteorologist Troy Bridges said.

Dorian could make landfall in Florida as a tropical storm or even a Category 1 hurricane this weekend.

“We will see the impacts in Central Florida, including some rain from Dorian, well before landfall, possibly by late Friday or early Saturday,” Bridges said. “It is still too early to tell specifics about our impacts, however.”

Hurricane season runs through November, with Sept. 10 marking the peak.

The next three named storms will be called Erin, Fernand and Gabrielle.

Watches and warnings

A hurricane watch is in effect for:

  • Puerto Rico
  • Dominican Republic from Isla Saona to Samana

A tropical storm warning is in effect for:

  • Martinique
  • St. Lucia
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Puerto Rico

A tropical storm watch is in effect for:

  • Dominica
  • Grenada and its dependencies
  • Saba and St. Eustatius
  • Dominican Republic from Isla Saona to Punta Palenque
  • Dominican Republic from Samana to Puerto Plata

A hurricane watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area.

A watch is typically issued 48 hours before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force winds, conditions that make outside preparations difficult or dangerous.

A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.

A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area, generally within 48 hours.

Residents in the Virgin Islands should monitor the progress of Dorian.